Friday, June 5, 2009

Food for Thought

The above chart makes me think twice about my notion that buying organic is somehow sticking it to the man or undermining the system.


You should also check out this report on the soy industry.

15 comments:

usedtothink said...

thank you! checking out the background of my soy providers wouldn't have even crossed my mind

anon said...

Getting a product certified "organic" is so ridiculously expensive, that it's inevitable that the smaller companies will fall to larger manufacturers. The best thing to do is buy from local farms, if that's an option.

Now I understand why my favorite organic snack cracker tastes exactly like regular wheat thins. Thanks, Kraft. Maybe they just use different packaging...=?

Millie said...

I like your blog. I also have a vegan blog called:
htp://nuestracena-vegancuisine.blogspot.com

I hope you can stop by some time. I'll keep you in my favorites.

Yellow Archer said...

Well, that's depressing. Good to know, but depressing.

Michelle (a fellow Canadian) said...

Thank you for sharing these links!
I'm not so concerned about the ownership of the "small" organic companies that I buy my food from... when at all possible I try to source out local producers, but of course that is nearly impossible. The fact that the "big guys" are behind the scenes just means that they have access to the distribution networks etc...
Now the soy information... now THAT IS interesting!! Good to know which soy manufacturers are using soybeans from China etc etc... I'll be using this information in my buying decisions!

Joanne said...

After reading The Omnivore's Dilemma, I totally felt the same way. In it he goes into the system behind a huge chain like Whole Foods and it's completely not what you would think. Even though what's really best is to only eat locally produced foods from small farms, we can all concede that sometimes that's impossible. So I think buying organic on those occasions is the better alternative.

Sargasso Sea said...

The chart and the report are rather disturbing aren't they? And it is too bad too 'cuz I like to 'stick it to the man' as often as possible :)

Thanks for your great site - I've FINALLY gone (at least) lacto/ovo and find you not only helpful but funny too!

Sea

jane said...

yikes, that is so disappointing that even when consumers try to get away from large corporations by buying organic, they are actually still giving their money to the food giants they scorn.
i've read about that before in "omnivore's dilemma", which has a great section that goes into detail about some of the hidden truths about organic foods.
i guess local farmers markets or CSA is just the best way to go. at least then your know where you food is coming from and who your money is going to.

[eam] said...

An individual can never buy activism. No matter how much being a "conscious consumer" may sound noble, really the only way to be political about the food you buy is to buy everything local (...and even that in itself is a privileged choice).

rekeyed said...

Then you have to start thinking about things like the increased demand for menhaden fish in order to create "fish emulsion", (a fertilizer deemed organic that is exactly what it sounds like.) and subsequent impact on their eco-system.

AB said...

That chart is all the more reason to buy local, small and make fresh from home!

Holly said...

That may seem bad, but when you buy a Dagoba chocolate bar, for instance, you are telling Hershey that there is a demand for the product, and they will produce more of it. If more people buy Dagoba chocolate and fewer buy regular Hershey bars, then Hershey will manufacture more organic chocolate and less non-organic chocolate.

Bobbi said...

Thanks, this reinforces my desire to grow more of my own food! But then I start to think about where the seeds come from.

Anonymous said...

the term Organic has been defined, and then redefined over and over again to suit the interests of corporations. People who feel superior about buying organic are mislead and misinformed! BUY LOCAL! and cook from scratch like you do!

Ethical Pizza said...

Holly: "That may seem bad, but when you buy a Dagoba chocolate bar, for instance, you are telling Hershey that there is a demand for the product, and they will produce more of it. If more people buy Dagoba chocolate and fewer buy regular Hershey bars, then Hershey will manufacture more organic chocolate and less non-organic chocolate."

This "the invisible hand / market forces will make it all work out" is nothing but smoke and mirrors. Time and again it has been shown that this is in fact NOT what always happens.