Tuesday, June 29, 2010

Portuguese Sweet Bread: Baking Through the Bread Baker's Apprentice

Portuguese sweet bread? Yeah, I've never heard if it either. But, supposedly it's a thing, and according the Reinhart the east coast is the "center of the Portuguese sweet bread universe." I wonder what Portugal thinks of that. This is a large, fluffy, slightly sweet loaf, scented with lemon and orange extracts. It has a thick, deep brown crust and makes great toast in the morning. I also can't find the picture I took of the bread so go check out this one.

GENERAL NOTES
1. I used 9" pie plates, as Reinhart instructs, but my dough did not rise and overlap the edge as his instruction indicate. No matter. It still baked up just fine.
2. I baked for 50 mins. Any more and it would have been too dry, I think.

VEGAN NOTES
1. I replaced the powdered milk with powdered soy.
2. I replaced the eggs with an equal weight of soy yogurt.
3. I replaced the butter with margarine.
4. I replaced the egg wash with plain soy milk.

10 comments:

Tiffany said...

I hadn't heard of this bread prior to seeing Reinhart's recipe, either, but then realized that this is essentially what inspired Hawaiian sweet bread. I tried this recipe in much the way you did and also found that my dough didn't overlap the pie plate edges.

Elizabeth said...

Oh wonderful! My husband talks about his grandmother's Portuguese sweet bread all the time! But she lived in Hawaii another area with a large Portuguese population, they sell it at the stores now as Hawaiian Sweet Bread.

SMR said...

Well, I'm portuguese and I thought Portugal was the "center of the Portuguese sweet bread universe"! That's a really tasty bread, although I don't eat it... It's very very difficult being vegan in Portugal. I'm a fan of the blog! Sandra

Cara Sheppard said...

I grew up in a largely Portuguese neighbourhood (though I'm not Portuguese), and just reading the words "Portuguese Sweet Bread" brought back all sorts of sensory memories from childhood. All the mothers baked it in the afternoon, and would shove a warm slice into our hands as we walked through the door after school. Yum! I'm so happy to hear it can be successfully veganized.

AILF Exchange Visitor Program said...

rhode island and south eastern mass are really the centers of the sweet bread universe. azorean immigrants brought it there, along with a lot of other delicious foods.

i grew up in new england, and my grandmother always brought big soft loaves of portuguese sweet bread when she visited.

i've been afraid to make a vegan version because i know it can't match my memories...

AILF Exchange Visitor Program said...

rhode island and south eastern mass are really the centers of the sweet bread universe. azorean immigrants brought it there, along with a lot of other delicious foods.

i grew up in new england, and my grandmother always brought big soft loaves of portuguese sweet bread when she visited.

i've been afraid to make a vegan version because i know it can't match my memories...

Jenn McCauley said...

I just found your blog in the latest issue of VegNews - congratulations! Our family is from Ontario but are living in Kansas City (a city known for its barbeque) so we're used to the confused looks when discussing food with friends/family. I have to rely on my [previously non-existent] cooking skills to feed our family and your recipes look delicious. Thank you for sharing.

Jess said...

Oh, my goodness, this post just made my day (and week)! My wife is Portuguese and grew up eating her grandmother's homemade "massa" (sweet bread). Once we met, I came to adore it as well. Now that we are vegan, we have been trying unsuccessfully to recreate our favourite bread, and miss it terribly. I am delighted to see this here, and can't wait to try the recipe! We are traveling to visit her (very non-veg) family this weekend and it would be great to bring a vegan massa along with us. Thank you so much!

adma-8d said...

Hi! I'm Portuguese and at first I thought "wth is a Portuguese sweet bread"? And after the shock I had with "Portuguese breakfast" I was rather scared to know what it is lol After a quick search though I figured out what it is. It's more known for being eaten at Easter - those usually have eggs-, but, at least in my region, it's not very common, and it's not usual for any random person to know how it's made.
So congratulations for being able to do it! It's a nightmare for me to (try to) make bread TT__TT

yeaaahtoast said...

I'm late in commenting about this, but my grandmother was originally from Portugal (emmigrated to Brazil and then over to Hawai'i where I'm from) and growing up this was the ONLY bread we ever ate. That is, when my texan dad wasn't around with his sourdough and biscuits.
I miss this stuff! Glad to know it can be veganized successfully!